As various news outlets reacted to the attacks on the office of Charlie Hebdo and Hypercacher, a Kosher deli in Paris, producers across America picked up their phones, looking for people to speak for the global Muslim community. When jihadists take lives, Muslim public intellectuals are often asked to explain, make distinctions, or even apologize. Arsalan Iftikhar, Dalia Mogahed, and Reza Aslan share their stories from years spent answering for Islam. They reflect on the media’s role in distributing images of violence and propaganda, and the editorial decisions around when to publish—or not to publish—images of the Prophet.

This discussion took place at the 2015 Aspen Ideas Festival.

The Atlantic’s Leon Wieseltier and The Islamic Monthly’s Arsalan Iftikhar discuss current upticks in anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, their impact on the rise of right-wing political parties in Europe, American media coverage of religious hate crimes, and more. How might interfaith cooperation and inter-Abrahamic dialogue work to change a worrisome trend?

This discussion took place at the 2015 Aspen Ideas Festival.

Most young Americans dramatically underestimate the physical burdens of aging. Inventor Bran Ferren has created an Iron Man-style suit that simulates the physical and sensory effects of the process, including cataracts, aphasia, and arthritis. In this episode of If Our Bodies Could Talk, James Hamblin experiences life as a 75-year-old.

Here at The Atlantic, we’re interested in the history behind things in everyday life—in this case, how humans have chosen to get intoxicated for thousands of years. The Mongols fermented mare’s milk to make a drink called kumis, and the Aztecs drank pulque, a fermented agave sap. Chicha is corn beer that was a favorite of the Incans, and tonto is banana beer from Uganda. What could be next? Craft beer may be having its moment, but we’re playing the long game.