Hillary Clinton is launching a concerted effort to pull that image apart, beginning with highlighting quotes from 2006 and 2007 where the real estate mogul speculated he could cash in on a housing market crash. The message is simple: Trump is pretending to be a defender of middle class Americans when in fact, he has sought to personally benefit from their losses.

In an audiobook produced for Trump University 10 years ago, Trump, asked about predictions of a forthcoming housing market crash, responded: “I sort of hope that happens because then, people like me would go in and buy.”

Trump added: “If there is a bubble burst, as they call it, you know you can make a lot of money.”

At a campaign rally Tuesday, Clinton accused Trump of wishing for a financial crash so that he could “make some money for himself.”

“He said ‘I sort of hope that happens.’ He actually said that,” Clinton said. “And now he says he wants to roll back the financial regulations that we have imposed on Wall Street to let them run wild again. Well I will tell you what — you and I together, we’re not going to let him.”

The attacks recall the 2012 election, where President Barack Obama and Democrats relentlessly went after GOP nominee Mitt Romney’s work in private equity. Obama and his surrogates sought to paint Romney as a wealthy and out-of-touch businessman who struck profitable business deals even at the expense of middle class jobs.

Trump defended his business record in a statement Tuesday.

“I am a businessman and I have made a lot of money in down markets, in some cases as much as I’ve made when markets are good,” he said. “Frankly, this is the kind of thinking our country needs — understanding how to get a good result out of a very bad and sad situation. Politicians have no idea how to do this — they don’t have a clue. I will create jobs, bring back companies and not make it easy for companies to leave. If they do, they will fully understand that there will be consequences. Our jobs market will flourish.”

The housing market crashed in 2008, setting off a devastating financial crisis that wrecked the livelihoods of millions of Americans. Years later, plenty of voters across the country feel that they never fully recovered, and have flocked to anti-establishment, populist candidates like Trump and Sanders this year.

With the general election still more than five months away, the Clinton campaign is testing out a range of political attacks against Trump including on his controversial rhetoric and his foreign policy views. Last week, Clinton questioned Trump’s eligibility to be president, telling CNN’s Chris Cuomo: “He is not qualified to be president of the United States.”

Trump managed to maintain his popularity throughout the campaign despite making public statements that would have seriously damaged most other politicians. Trump has referred to some Mexicans coming into the United States as criminals and rapists; mocked Sen. John McCain’s captivity in the Vietnam War, saying: “I like people that weren’t captured”; and made questionable comments about women including then-presidential candidate Carly Fiorina and Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly.

The housing crisis quotes are an attack Clinton’s campaign hopes can work in swing states such as Florida, Ohio and Nevada. Multiple members unleashed their criticism on the House floor on Tuesday.

Nevada Rep. Dina Titus lamented the devastation in Las Vegas after the housing crash, and had this to say to the presumptive GOP nominee: “Keep your short fingers out of the Nevada housing market.”

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan also weighed in, saying, “Shame on you, Mr. Trump. You are supposed to be rooting for the American people not rooting against them.”

Clinton’s surrogates will continue going after Trump on the issue in six battleground states through a series of press calls, statements and events, according to campaign aides. The campaign also highlighted a 2007 interview in which Trump said he was “excited” at the prospect of soft real estate markets. “People have been talking about the end of the cycle for 12 years, and I’m excited if it is,” he told the Toronto Globe and Mail. “I’ve always made more money in bad markets than in good markets.”

In a call with reporters Tuesday, Tampa, Florida, Mayor Bob Buckhorn said Trump’s comments were “shameful” and “disqualifying.”

“I don’t know how you make America great again when you root for it to fail so you can make a quick buck,” Buckhorn said.

The Democratic National Committee also jumped on the newly surfaced remarks from Trump on the housing market. In a press release accusing Trump of having “cheered on” the collapse of the housing market, the DNC noted that the crash was devastating to minorities like Hispanics and African-Americans.

“Donald Trump’s lack of concern for the economic well-being of hard-working families shows that he doesn’t have the judgment and temperament to occupy the Oval Office,” wrote DNC spokesperson Luis Miranda.

She sang “1944,” a song about the deportation of Crimean Tatars by the Soviet Union on orders of Josef Stalin. Her performance also was considered a strong rebuke to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s 2014 military push into Ukraine, according to European media reports. Russia annexed Crimea.

Russian state media this week called the song anti-Russian; Moscow said it violated Eurovision rules.

Contest officials ruled the song didn’t breach rules preventing “lyrics, speeches or gestures of a political or similar nature.”

Jamala, whose full name is Susana Jamaladynova, told Ukraine Today in February that she wrote the song because she was inspired by a story her great-grandmother told her about the deportation of her family and others in Crimea.

“I would prefer that all these terrible things did not happen to my great-grandmother, and I would even prefer if this song did not exist,” the tearful competitor told reporters after the competition.

Stalin accused the Tatars of collaborating with the Germans during World War II, according to Encyclopedia Brittanica.

Jamala said that the composition is about all people who are victims of past tragedies. She prepared for the contest by listening to the soundtrack from the Holocaust movie “Schindler’s List.” Jamala said she hopes her song will have the same power as the movie’s music.

When strangers are coming /

They come to your house /

They kill you all /

and say, We’re not guilty, not guilty /

Where is your mind? /

Humanity cries /

You think you are gods /

But everyone dies /

Don’t swallow my soul /

There is no specific mention of Russia or its rulers.

Jamala told the UK’s Guardian newspaper this week in a phone interview that she had not been home since Moscow’s intervention.

“Of course, it’s about 2014 as well,” she told the newspaper. “These two years have added so much sadness to my life.”

“I really want peace and love to everyone,” Jamala said as she accepted the winner’s trophy. Later, at the news conference, she said: “I was sure that if you sing, if you talk about truth, it can really touch people. And I was right.”

Eurovision is the longest-running international TV song contest. It was held this year in Stockholm, Sweden.

Dami Im of Australia finished second after getting high marks from the professional judges.

Australia’s Dami Im won the most points (320) from the jury panels of professionals in 42 countries participating in the voting, but didn’t get enough points from the viewer call-in votes and finished second.

Russia’s Sergey Lazarev finished third.

Next year’s contest will be held in Ukraine, thanks to Jamala’s victory.

CNN’s Matthew Chance in Moscow and Lonzo Cook, Samantha Beech and Bijan Hosseini contributed to this report.

For more than two months, most Pyongyang citizens have been expected to rise early and go to bed late. Sometimes they go without sleep at all, so they can fully maximize productivity during the “70-day battle” — a nationwide call to action by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

The grueling hours are part of a massive state-mandated drive to prepare Pyongyang for a once-in-a-generation political gathering that begins Friday.

To say the upcoming 7th Congress of Workers’ Party is a big deal is putting it mildly. It’s the highest political gathering that can be held in the country.

The last time it was hosted in 1980, Kim Il Sung, North Korea’s founder and President, elevated his son Kim Jong Il to No. 2 in the party, solidifying his position as successor.

This time around, there is speculation the current supreme leader, believed to be in his 30s, could move away from his father’s “military first” ideology and reinforce his own creed of simultaneous nuclear and economic development.

However, North Korean officials insist the congress is simply a continuation of Kim Jong Il’s “revolutionary philosophy” of “single hearted unity” in which there is a “blood kinship” between the leadership, the party and the people.

Hyon Un Mi, who works as a guide at the Arch of Triumph in Pyongyang, said she hasn’t taken a single day off in the 70-day lead-up to the congress. When she’s not giving tours, Hyon works with a crew refurbishing the nearby Kim Il Sung Stadium. And she’s overjoyed to do it, she told me.

“We the Korean people think our leader Kim Jong Un is just like our father, just like our mother. And so we trust him and we do our best for building a thriving country,” Hyon said.

Nuclear concerns

The congress is also likely to see Marshal Kim, as the supreme leader is known, announce the continuation of North Korea’s nuclear weapons program. It’s a major reason why many South Korean and U.S. government officials believe a fifth nuclear test could be imminent — either before or during the congress.
Kim ordered what was claimed to be a hydrogen bomb test on the same week of his birthday in January. It was followed a month later by a satellite launch, which led the United States and its allies to push for a new round of strong sanctions aimed at halting the regime’s nuclear and missile programs.
In the last few weeks, North Korea has attempted to launch two midrange missiles, both of which are believed to have failed. The government also touted the launch of a missile from a submarine.

Eyes of the world

If the North does conduct another nuclear test, the eyes of the world will be watching. Hundreds of international journalists are here to cover the upcoming congress — a larger number than is usually invited for major events in this nation with a reputation for secrecy.

Driving through Pyongyang from the airport to our hotel, we encountered a kind of spring cold front that makes you want to run inside and grab a winter blanket. Yet thousands of people in formal attire were hunched under umbrellas, standing in sideways rain in Kim Il Sung Square — named for North Korea’s founding father, who still holds the title of “eternal president” 22 years after his death.

Apparently they were rehearsing some type of highly choreographed, group display of public devotion to the leadership. And skipping rehearsal isn’t an option in a country known for supersize parades to mark major events.

Despite talk of heightened security, we passed through a single checkpoint on the 20-minute drive from the airport to the hotel downtown.

As with any reporting trip to North Korea, we were under the constant supervision of government escorts and could never travel freely. Journalists are rarely allowed outside Pyongyang, where defectors have claimed that life is often a daily struggle — with limited food, scarce power and outdated faming and hospital equipment.

Out on the streets, people could be seen hanging banners, sweeping sidewalks and planting flowers ahead of the congress. Student bands played patriotic tunes to lift the spirits of citizens and encourage them to work harder.

Shortly after he took power, Kim Jong Un pledged to improve people’s living standards. He has since overseen construction of a long list of public amenities, including a water park, equestrian center, opulent nursery and pediatric hospital.

Critics of the government have long claimed these luxuries are reserved only for the most trusted North Koreans, who are privileged enough to live in the showpiece capital.

This didn’t appear to be the case in the parts of Pyongyang we were allowed to see. The city’s skyline was surprisingly well-lit at night. People had smartphones and flat-screen televisions.

At a new Pyongyang department store, I met a primary school teacher named Kim Song Rim, who was dressed to the nines in colorful, modern clothing — likely imported from China.

Her 2-year-old son wore an outfit far sharper than anything I had at that age. I asked her if everyone in North Korea lives the way she does.

“Yes, simply look around,” she said. “We are all equal here.”